fuckyeahplattenbau:

Petržalka, a neighborhood in Bratislava.

(via rosswolfe)

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Hand Sewn portraits by David Catá

Does love really has to hurt? According to artist David Catá it obviously does. The Spanish artist uses his body as a canvas, writing an autobiographical diary. In his ongoing series ‘A Flor De Piel’, he embroiders portraits of people who have influenced or marked his life – family, friends, teachers, lovers, partners – sewn into the palm of his hand.



f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Hand Sewn portraits by David Catá

Does love really has to hurt? According to artist David Catá it obviously does. The Spanish artist uses his body as a canvas, writing an autobiographical diary. In his ongoing series ‘A Flor De Piel’, he embroiders portraits of people who have influenced or marked his life – family, friends, teachers, lovers, partners – sewn into the palm of his hand.



f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Hand Sewn portraits by David Catá

Does love really has to hurt? According to artist David Catá it obviously does. The Spanish artist uses his body as a canvas, writing an autobiographical diary. In his ongoing series ‘A Flor De Piel’, he embroiders portraits of people who have influenced or marked his life – family, friends, teachers, lovers, partners – sewn into the palm of his hand.



f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Hand Sewn portraits by David Catá

Does love really has to hurt? According to artist David Catá it obviously does. The Spanish artist uses his body as a canvas, writing an autobiographical diary. In his ongoing series ‘A Flor De Piel’, he embroiders portraits of people who have influenced or marked his life – family, friends, teachers, lovers, partners – sewn into the palm of his hand.



f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Hand Sewn portraits by David Catá

Does love really has to hurt? According to artist David Catá it obviously does. The Spanish artist uses his body as a canvas, writing an autobiographical diary. In his ongoing series ‘A Flor De Piel’, he embroiders portraits of people who have influenced or marked his life – family, friends, teachers, lovers, partners – sewn into the palm of his hand.



f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Hand Sewn portraits by David Catá

Does love really has to hurt? According to artist David Catá it obviously does. The Spanish artist uses his body as a canvas, writing an autobiographical diary. In his ongoing series ‘A Flor De Piel’, he embroiders portraits of people who have influenced or marked his life – family, friends, teachers, lovers, partners – sewn into the palm of his hand.



f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Hand Sewn portraits by David Catá

Does love really has to hurt? According to artist David Catá it obviously does. The Spanish artist uses his body as a canvas, writing an autobiographical diary. In his ongoing series ‘A Flor De Piel’, he embroiders portraits of people who have influenced or marked his life – family, friends, teachers, lovers, partners – sewn into the palm of his hand.



f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Hand Sewn portraits by David Catá

Does love really has to hurt? According to artist David Catá it obviously does. The Spanish artist uses his body as a canvas, writing an autobiographical diary. In his ongoing series ‘A Flor De Piel’, he embroiders portraits of people who have influenced or marked his life – family, friends, teachers, lovers, partners – sewn into the palm of his hand.



f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Hand Sewn portraits by David Catá

Does love really has to hurt? According to artist David Catá it obviously does. The Spanish artist uses his body as a canvas, writing an autobiographical diary. In his ongoing series ‘A Flor De Piel’, he embroiders portraits of people who have influenced or marked his life – family, friends, teachers, lovers, partners – sewn into the palm of his hand.



f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Hand Sewn portraits by David Catá

Does love really has to hurt? According to artist David Catá it obviously does. The Spanish artist uses his body as a canvas, writing an autobiographical diary. In his ongoing series ‘A Flor De Piel’, he embroiders portraits of people who have influenced or marked his life – family, friends, teachers, lovers, partners – sewn into the palm of his hand.

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Hand Sewn portraits by David Catá

Does love really has to hurt? According to artist David Catá it obviously does. The Spanish artist uses his body as a canvas, writing an autobiographical diary. In his ongoing series ‘A Flor De Piel’, he embroiders portraits of people who have influenced or marked his life – family, friends, teachers, lovers, partners – sewn into the palm of his hand.

(via hotch0colate)

w4lrusss:

Museum of Broken Relationships

Plastic Mary holy water bottle
1988, 2 months
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
In the summer of 1988 I met my transient lover in Amsterdam. He had a stopover during his travels. He was from Peru, discovering Europe by train. We met at the Buddha Disco.
Not long after we bumped into each other on the street he went home with me and stayed for about two months. Suddenly he was gone. I found a goodbye note and this little statue, which he had specifically brought from Peru in the hope of meeting a new love. What he didn’t know was that I had once opened his bag, and found a whole plastic bag full of these bottles. I never saw him again.

explore-blog:

"What happens in the brain that makes sugary foods so hard to resist?" An animated answer from TED-Ed and Nicole Avena, author of Why Diets Fail

Pair with a look at how long it takes to form a new habit and how to rewire your habit loops

(via NPR)

“I can never read all the books I want; I can never be all the people I want and live all the lives I want. I can never train myself in all the skills I want. And why do I want? I want to live and feel all the shades, tones and variations of mental and physical experience possible in life. And I am horribly limited.”
— Sylvia Plath (via observando)

(via yeahwriters)

“Indeed, the most somber speculation I can make about A.D. 2014 is that in a society of enforced leisure, the most glorious single word in the vocabulary will have become ‘work!’”

Isaac Asimov

A visit to the 1964 New York World’s Fair inspired Isaac Asimov to write this New York Times piece about his predictions for the year 2014. Aside from his visions of glowing walls and televisions shaped like glass cubes, he gets some things right. 

(via 99percentinvisible)
99percentinvisible:

Soviet bus stops, by photographer Christopher Herwig. 
Soviet design truly had its merits:
99percentinvisible:

Soviet bus stops, by photographer Christopher Herwig. 
Soviet design truly had its merits:
99percentinvisible:

Soviet bus stops, by photographer Christopher Herwig. 
Soviet design truly had its merits:
99percentinvisible:

Soviet bus stops, by photographer Christopher Herwig. 
Soviet design truly had its merits:
99percentinvisible:

Soviet bus stops, by photographer Christopher Herwig. 
Soviet design truly had its merits:

99percentinvisible:

Soviet bus stops, by photographer Christopher Herwig. 

Soviet design truly had its merits:

cocorry:

image

Writing and thenbeing like, “There’s probably a word for this sort of area in a house.” “There ought to be a word for those wooden paneled things next to windows.” and you can’t very well just go google it and hope the sloppy definition gives you a word.

So I’ve decided to do…

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

humansofnewyork:

"I may look like a schlub, but I’ve attended 6,000 art lectures at The Met, and I’ve got more degrees than a thermometer."